Nancy Lord About Continued

Who stood for you that day?

At our March 2008 County Central Committee meeting, the then-County Party Vice Chairman Rick Votaw proposed a rules change that would have given automatic delegate seats to the 31 appointed Legislative District Chairs. I was a lead speaker & writer in opposing it, and it has never (yet) been adopted, even though many party leaders spoke in favor of it. This would have diluted the elected delegates’ votes, taking seats away from 31 precincts that had rightfully earned them.

Who stood for you that day?

In December 2008, then-County GOP Chair James Evans proposed to not only make the 31 appointed Legislative District Chairs automatic delegates, but also lock up another 791 county and 791 state delegate seats (that was 2 in each and every precinct) to give to precinct chairs. That would have permanently denied all precinct caucuses the fundamental right to separately elect their delegates. Again, I was one of the leading opponents who convinced our precinct chairs to vote against this massive power grab.

Who stood for you that day?

In March 2001, County Party leaders tried to completely eliminate this off-year County Organizing Convention, instead proposing to give the County Central Committee the job of voting on party officers and State Central Committee reps. Again, I was there leading the fight to stop it.

Who stood for you that day?

At a recent County Central Committee meeting (March 2015), our precinct chairs and county party leaders voted to erase the last vestige in our County Party Bylaws making reference to a power you as county delegates once had, but which has been stripped away from you – the right to vote on the Party’s governing rules. I was one of only a few who had the historical knowledge and the passion to stand and fight to keep that wording in the Bylaws, and to speak up for returning to you the right to vote on the Party’s rules. We were not successful, but I stood for you that day.

I also helped draft and work with legislators in 2004 to adopt HB 40, the bill which gave to county & state delegates the unilateral power to fill mid-term vacancies in the Legislature. Under the old state law, we had to submit three names to the Governor, who made the final choice. Since then, the delegates who chose the original Republican candidate get to also choose his or her replacement.

Who stood for you that day?

These are just a few of the times I’ve gone to bat for delegates and your right to have an undiluted voice in our Party. Over the years, I’ve also led grassroots efforts to 1) make appointed committees elected, 2) prevent cutting in half the number of elected county representatives on the State Central Committee, and 3) protect each precinct’s right to their full allocation of delegate seats.

I opposed SB54 forcing the Party to open our primary elections to non-Republicans if we want to continue to have an “R” by our candidates’ names on the ballot.

I opposed the State Party Chair’s recent (2015) proposal to create a “vetting” committee that can decide which Republican candidates qualify to run as Republicans. We should not give Party leaders that kind of power. Ballot access is a fundamental American principle. Let the grassroots delegates or primary voters decide who they want to represent them!

I will continue to stand for you. I already have.